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Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park is located on the Island of Hawai’i, 96 miles from Kailua-Kona and 30 miles from Hilo.

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park was established in 01 Aug 1916 as Hawai’i National Park, and on 22 Sep 1961, its name was changed to Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. The Park displays the results of 70 million years of volcanism, migration, and evolution — processes that thrust a bare land from the sea and clothed it with complex and unique ecosystems and a distinct human culture. The park encompasses 230,000 acres and ranges from sea level to the summit of the earth’s most massive volcano, Mauna Loa at 13,677 feet. Kilauea, the world’s most active volcano, offers scientists insights on the birth of the Hawai’ian Islands and visitors views of dramatic volcanic landscapes. Over half of the park is designated wilderness and provides unusual hiking and camping opportunities. In recognition of its outstanding natural values, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park has been honored as an International Biosphere Reserve and a World Heritage Site.

Volcanos are monuments to earth’s origin, evidence that its primordial forces are still at work. During a volcanic eruption, we are reminded that our planet is an ever changing environment whose basic processes are beyond human control. As much as we have altered the face of the earth to suite our needs, we can only stand in awe before the power of an eruption.

Today Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park displays the results of 70 million years of volcanism, migration, and evolution – processes that thrust a bare land from the sea and clothed it with complex and unique ecosystems and a distinct human culture. Created to preserve the natural setting of Kilauea and Mauna Loa, the park is also a refuge for the island’s native plants and animals and a link to its human past. Park managers work to protect the resources and promote understanding and appreciation of the park by visitors. Research by scientists at the Hawai’ian Volcano Observatory has made Kilauea one of the best understood volcanoes in the world, shedding light on the birth of the Hawai’ian Islands and the beginning of planet Earth.

Website: Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

HTR Big Island Admin

February 28th, 2017

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